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Experts informed patients about the topic of cervical cancer

Experts informed patients about the topic of cervical cancer

St Elizabeth Group Limited on April 24, 2024

On Tuesday, April 23, 2024, Prof. Dr. Clemens Tempfer, Director of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic at the Marien Herne Hospital, with his team about cervical cancer and its precursors. In addition to prevention, event topics also included current treatment options.

Patients familiar with the topic of cervical cancer: Prof. Dr. Clemens Timfer (left), Director of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, and Dr. Julia Hicken (R), Assistant Physician in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic.

The Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Marien Herne Hospital – University Hospital of the Ruhr University Bochum has been certified as a dysplasia unit since 2017 and is therefore specialized in the treatment of women with cervical cancer and its precursors, so-called dysplasia. Those affected and interested can now ask the experts their questions as part of the patient event.

The event focused on three main topics, the first being the causes and development of dysplasia and cervical cancer. Young women are often affected by changes in the cells of the cervix, which may lead to cervical cancer. The cause of the disease is the HP virus (human papillomavirus), which is most often transmitted through sexual contact. In about 50% of cases, the immune system is able to fight the virus and the disease disappears on its own over time.

The possibility of prevention was presented in the second lecture. HPV vaccination provides effective protection against infection with HPV. Cervical cancer is now almost 100% preventable through HPV vaccination, which is unique in the context of cancer prevention.

Finally, the Women's Clinic team focused on the current status of treatment options for cervical cancer. Professor Dr. explains Clemens Tempfer, Director of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic at the Marien Herne Hospital – University Hospital of the Ruhr University Bochum. For mild forms, close monitoring is often sufficient. In the case of high-grade dysplasia, the altered area of ​​the endometrium is surgically removed transvaginally using a laparoscope. No incisions are needed and the patient is placed under less pressure.

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