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Hopeful groundbreaking discoveries: First color images from the Webb telescope outstanding

Hopeful groundbreaking discoveries: First color images from the Webb telescope outstanding

On July 12, 2022, the European Space Agency, NASA and the Canadian Space Agency wish to publish the first color images from the joint James Webb Space Telescope. On the one hand, the images are intended to show the performance of the device, and on the other hand, they are intended to provide an overview of the upcoming scientific mission.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the largest and most complex observatory ever launched into space. The images will be the result of a six-month preparation period. For example, the instruments had to first be calibrated in space and the mirrors aligned.

Those responsible for the project at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore are sure that the images will create an impressive effect for viewers. However, it is difficult to predict exactly what will be presented to her. Entirely new discoveries are possible, similar to the discovery of dark matter in 1990 by the Hubble telescope.

Objectively speaking, the images are intended to cover core areas of James Webb’s mission: the early universe and the evolution of star systems, as well as the life cycle of stars and other worlds. The European Space Agency, NASA and the Canadian Space Agency hope that the telescope will lead to groundbreaking discoveries in all areas of astronomy.

In addition to the images, the launch dates for the telescope will also be published on July 12, 2022. The first alignment images have already shown the telescope’s infrared display sharpness. However, the new images will be the first color images. It also aims to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the Webb Telescope for the first time. According to NASA, in addition to images, it also records so-called spectroscopic data – data resulting from measuring the intensity of radiation properties such as wavelength, energy or mass.

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NASA wants to publish the pictures below nasa.gov/webbfirstimages.


(kst)

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