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Wiener at the Physics Olympiad in Tokyo

Wiener at the Physics Olympiad in Tokyo

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A 16-year-old student from Vienna, Lucas Gabriel, has been allowed to participate in the Physics Olympiad in Tokyo in July. He has already won all competitions in Vienna and Austria. His talent was discovered and encouraged at his school, the Albertus-Magnus-Gymnasium.

Lukas Gabriel is one of the 500 best physics boys and girls around the world – at least many of them will compete at the Tokyo Olympics. The teaching team discovered him two years ago in a special high-level physics course at his high school – and then encouraged him.

“I have been interested in the natural sciences and physics all my life,” Lukas Gabriel said in an interview with Vienna Today. “I think it’s cool that you can notice things and then explain and predict them. I would like now to study physics and then become a physicist as well.”

Physics talent in the photo

A 16-year-old student from Vienna, Lucas Gabriel, has been allowed to participate in the Physics Olympiad in Tokyo in July. He has already won all competitions at the level of Vienna and Austria. His talent for physics was discovered and encouraged at his school, the Albertus-Magnu-Gymnasium in Währing.

Training at the University of Vienna

The intensive training area for the 16-year-old is currently the physics room for the teacher training course at the University of Vienna. “Luke is someone I got to know as a very diligent, very interested student who likes to get to the bottom of things,” said Marianne Korner of the University of Vienna’s Faculty of Physics. “This gives you the best conditions for becoming a good scientist.”

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The Olympics from July 10 to 17

The Physics Olympiad will be held in Japan from July 10 to 17. “I’m glad I can be there,” said Lucas Gabriel. And: “Of course, I want to get the best of Austria.” In the indoor qualifying competition, he scored twice as many points as the second-place finisher, says physics teacher Erwin Kronberger: “He was really much better than the second-place finisher.” Maybe Lucas could do that even if he was a Nobel laureate? “I hope so, of course. Well, it would be possible,” Kronberger smiled.

In addition to the natural sciences, Lukas also enjoys bike tours as a balance to study. His life doesn’t just revolve around physics. “But the physics is always there,” says the 16-year-old.