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Look deep into the universe – this is how Hubble sees the universe

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from: Tanya Banner

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From Earth’s orbit, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope looks deep into the universe–providing fascinating images of planets, galaxies, star clusters, and other phenomena.

1/10The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) in the constellation Cassiopeia is an emission nebula about 7,100 light-years from Earth. The bubble shape is formed by the stellar wind from a star spewing out large amounts of gas. The gases collide with a huge molecular cloud located in this region – a shock wave is generated that forms the outer envelope of the gas bubble. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the open star cluster Trumpler 14 (also known as Collinder 230) in the keel of the constellation Ship.  The star cluster is about 9,000 light-years away in the Carina Nebula.  It is one of the younger star clusters in the Milky Way, only 300,000 to 500,000 years old.  Trumpler 14 is home to about 2,000 young stars, including one of the brightest stars in the Milky Way.
2/10This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the open star cluster Trumpler 14 (also known as Collinder 230) in the keel of the constellation Ship. The star cluster is about 9,000 light-years away in the Carina Nebula. It is one of the younger star clusters in the Milky Way, only 300,000 to 500,000 years old. Trumpler 14 is home to about 2,000 young stars, including one of the brightest stars in the Milky Way. © NASA, ESA, and J. Maíz Apellániz (The Astrophysical Institute of Andalusia, Spain); Acknowledgments: Ann Smith (University of Arizona)
The Pillars of Creation is one of the most famous Hubble images.  Here, a NASA space telescope is looking at a small region of the Eagle Nebula (M16), a star-forming region 6,500 light-years from Earth.
3/10The Pillars of Creation is one of the most famous Hubble images. Here, a NASA space telescope is looking at a small region of the Eagle Nebula (M16), a star-forming region 6,500 light-years from Earth. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Spiral galaxy M83 (the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy) is a popular target for amateur astronomers.  Located 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius, it is one of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern hemisphere sky.  Thousands of star clusters, hundreds of thousands of individual stars, and the remnants of dying stars (supernovae) can be seen in this image.
4/10Spiral galaxy M83 (the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy) is a popular target for amateur astronomers. Located 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius, it is one of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern hemisphere sky. Thousands of star clusters, hundreds of thousands of individual stars, and the remnants of dying stars (supernovae) can be seen in the Hubble image. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgments: W Blair (STScI/Johns Hopkins University) and R O’Connell (University of Virginia)
The Ring Nebula (M57) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Lyra.  It's the glowing remains of a once sun-like star that released its outer layer of gas some 20,000 years ago.  The ring is about 1.3 light-years across.  Inside a white dwarf star.
5/10The Ring Nebula (M57) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Lyra. It’s the glowing remains of a once sun-like star that released its outer layer of gas some 20,000 years ago. The ring is about 1.3 light-years across. Inside a white dwarf star. © NASA, ESA, CR O’Dell (Vanderbilt University) and D. Thompson (Large Eyes Telescope Observatory)
The iconic Horsehead Nebula is a popular target for amateur and professional astronomers alike.  The Horsehead Nebula is part of a dark cloud in the constellation of Orion, illuminated by a bright red nebula (IC 434).  The nebula is about 1,500 light-years away from Earth.
6/10The iconic Horsehead Nebula is a popular target for amateur and professional astronomers alike. The Horsehead Nebula is part of a dark cloud in the constellation of Orion, illuminated by a bright red nebula (IC 434). The nebula is about 1,500 light-years away from Earth. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
This image of the elliptical radio galaxy Hercules A is also from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.  The galaxy is 2.1 billion light-years away in the constellation Hercules.  Huge jets of plasma, thought to be powered by a supermassive black hole, can be seen in the galaxy's interior.
7/10This image of the elliptical radio galaxy Hercules A is also from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is 2.1 billion light-years away in the constellation Hercules. Huge jets of plasma, thought to be powered by a supermassive black hole, can be seen in the galaxy’s interior. © NASA, ESA, S. Baum, C.O’Dea (RIT), R. Perley, and W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF) and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
This image shows two spiral galaxies interacting with each other.  The group is called Arp 273. According to NASA, the unusual spiral patterns indicate that the two galaxies in this group are interacting or interacting with each other.  Arp 273 is about 300 million light-years from Earth, and the two galaxies are actually tens of thousands of light-years apart.  Just
8/10This image shows two spiral galaxies interacting with each other. The group is called Arp 273. According to NASA, the unusual spiral patterns indicate that the two galaxies in this group are interacting or interacting with each other. Arp 273 is about 300 million light-years from Earth, and the two galaxies are actually tens of thousands of light-years apart. Only a very subtle “bridge” connects the two. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
A gorgeous spiral galaxy is visible in this image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.  It is spiral galaxy NGC 2841, located 46 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major.
9/10A gorgeous spiral galaxy is visible in this image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. It is spiral galaxy NGC 2841, located 46 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. © NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA) -ESA/Hubble Collaboration; Acknowledgments: M Crockett and S Kaviraj (University of Oxford, UK), R O’Connell (University of Virginia), B Whitmore (STScI), WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee
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10/10This Hubble shot is like fireworks. In fact, it is the star-forming region NGC 3603 in the “Keel of the Ship” constellation. About 20,000 light-years away, the nebula isn’t as peaceful as it appears: ultraviolet light and violent stellar winds have exposed the star cluster. NGC 3603 hosts some of the largest stars known. They die early because they quickly burn hydrogen, which leads to a supernova explosion. © NASA, ESA, R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), F. Paresce (National Institute for Astrophysics, Bologna, Italy), E. Young (Universities Space Research Association / Ames Research Centre), the WFC3 Science Supervision Committee, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
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