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No electricity, no network: Hard to clean up after a hurricane in the United States

Strict comparisons are made in the states concerned. “We’re zero,” said Andy Bessier, governor of the state of Kentucky, who was particularly affected. Hundreds of buildings in Mayfield, with a population of 10,000, were completely demolished, leaving no roofs for standing buildings. Bessier said about 300 members of the National Guard are on duty. They went “house to house” to find the survivors and remove the rubble. Where there were no doors, they went “from ruined mountain to ruined mountain.”

In December 2021 the United States was hit by a tornado

The cleanup work and the recovery of the dead and wounded are making even more difficult progress. Most police vehicles were damaged as the fire station malfunctioned. Bessier said many survivors remain without shelter, water and electricity. The Civil Defense Agency distributed FEMA, including 30,000 foods and 45,000 liters of water.

Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane

AP / Maxar

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AP / Maxar

Before, after: In comparison, destruction is visible

U.S. media have reported that no one has been rescued from the rubble since Saturday. Emergency camps have been opened to pick up the victims. The night time temperature in the area was around freezing recently. Bessier stressed at a news conference Sunday that the failure of cell phone networks had made it harder to find the missing. “Disaster is like what I have seen in my life,” Bessier said. “It’s hard for me to put it into words.”

More than 30 hurricanes

According to the National Weather Service, 36 hurricanes hit the states of Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi on Saturday night. The largest hurricane to destroy Mayfield, according to officials, moved to an altitude of 320 kilometers above the Earth’s surface – making it one of the longest hurricanes ever recorded in the United States.

Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane
Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane

AP / Maxar

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AP / Maxar

Kentucky was particularly hard hit

So far, it is believed that more than a hundred people in Kentucky may have been victims of the hurricane. It is feared that up to 70 people may have died at a candle factory in Mayfield alone. A company spokesman told Reuters Sunday evening that the number was significantly lower and that eight confirmed deaths and eight missing were missing. “There is already one more, but thank God the number of victims is very, very low,” said spokesman Bob Ferguson. It is unknown at this time what he will do after leaving the post.

Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane
Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane

AP / Maxar

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AP / Maxar

In Edwardsville, Illinois, a hurricane struck the Amazon warehouse as Christmas orders were being processed on the night shift. Six bodies were recovered there, and 45 crew members were brought to safety, the fire department said. Dozens of employees are still missing. A hurricane also hit a nursing home in Arkansas, killing at least one resident in the town of Monet.

Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane
Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane

AP / Maxar

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AP / Maxar

In many buildings only the remains remain

Disaster explained

US President Joe Biden has now declared Kentucky a disaster, creating the conditions for federal aid. Biden also announced an environmental organization inquiry into what climate change could have played in the hurricanes. Scientists warn that the severity of natural disasters is increasing due to climate change. According to Pitton, “everything gets more intense when the weather warms up.”

Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane
Comparison of aerial photographs before and after the US hurricane

AP / Maxar

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AP / Maxar

Experts believe that extreme weather events will increase

FEMA CEO Dean Chriswell told CNN, “This will be our new default.” Chriswell said the effects of climate change were “a crisis of our generation” that could help reduce the impact of these severe weather events and protect communities from developing computer-level programs.

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