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The Frankfurt Labor Court rejects Deutsche Bahn's request to stop the strike

The Frankfurt Labor Court rejects Deutsche Bahn's request to stop the strike

In the dispute over the upcoming strike by the train drivers' union, Deutsche Bahn suffered defeat. The urgent application was rejected and the appeal has already been announced.

The GDL train drivers' union has achieved a staged victory in its collective bargaining dispute with Deutsche Bahn. On Monday evening, the Frankfurt Labor Court rejected an urgent application submitted by the company against the strike scheduled from Wednesday to Friday. Deutsche Bahn immediately announced that it would appeal to the labor court in the state of Hesse. Deutsche Bahn still believes that this strike lacks any legal basis.

He added: “This strike lacks legitimacy and basis. “For the benefit of our customers, we are doing everything we can to prevent this,” Deutsche Bahn said in a statement.

The train drivers' union (GDL) wants to go on strike in passenger transport from Wednesday 2am to Friday 6pm – in a week when traffic on German roads has already been severely affected by farmer protests. Experience has shown that even before the strike, some trains were not running according to plan. In addition, it usually takes some time for traffic to return to normal.

In the dispute over money and working hours, GDL wants to strike rail passenger transport for three days from Wednesday. In freight traffic, trains must be stationary from Tuesday evening to Friday. The railway considered the strike disproportionate after it responded to GDL's demand to reduce the weekly working hours of shift workers to 35 hours with full pay compensated by a new offer. The state-owned company offers a choice between more vacation and more pay. From GDL's point of view, this is unacceptable because the railways want to reduce the salary accordingly if working hours are reduced. (APA/DPA)

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