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UN report: Sandstorms are an underappreciated problem

UN report: Sandstorms are an underappreciated problem

United Nations report

Sand and dust storms are an underappreciated problem that now occurs much more frequently in parts of the world. This was announced today by the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. Much of the problem is due to human activities, and global and regional policy answers are needed.

It says that sandstorms cause devastating damage extending from northern and central Asia to Africa a report. In affected areas, soil is removed and crops are damaged. In addition to the economic consequences resulting from this method, according to what he mentioned United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification– Experts also give health problems such as respiratory diseases. Although the benefits are limited—the sandstorms also transported soil nutrients that benefited other areas—these benefits do not far outweigh the harm.

United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification/United Nations Environment Programme/Food and Agriculture Organization

Global sources of sandstorms

According to the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, the effects of this phenomenon extend beyond areas of origin: it is estimated that two billion tons of sand and dust enter the atmosphere every year around the world. The main source is the Aral Sea in Central Asia: more than 100 million tons of dust and toxic salts are moved there every year. The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification meets in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, until Friday.

Targeted reduction is possible

According to UNCCD experts, the underestimation of this phenomenon as a disaster risk in parts of the world may be due to the fact that in many cases no immediate deaths occur. The long-term health effects, but also the economic and other effects, have been documented only to a limited extent. The problem is exacerbated by improper land and water use, drought and climate change, according to experts at the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification.

“But just as human activities increase sand and dust storms, they can also be reduced through human actions,” Ibrahim Thiaw, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, was quoted as saying in a statement. Specifically, reasonable use of soil and water should ensure greater vegetation cover and soil protection. There is also a need for a monitoring and early warning system.

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