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Researchers believe that our entire universe could evaporate

Researchers believe that our entire universe could evaporate

Scientists have new insights into Stephen Hawking’s theory.
Getty Images/Mark Garlick/Science Picture Library

As early as 1974, astrophysicist Stephen Hawking proposed the theory that black holes evaporate by emitting what is known as Hawking radiation.

Scientists at a Dutch university have now discovered that other massive objects also emit this radiation, Research & Knowledge reports.

The results confirm Hawking’s theory – and provide information about the future of our universe.

Scientists at a Dutch university have discovered new insights into a theory put forward by astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, such as “Research and knowledgementioned. also “pictureAlready wrote about it. The results of the research showed that Hawking’s theory was correct and went further than originally thought. This may have implications for the future of our universe.

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Hawking’s original theory, which he put forward as early as 1974, states that black holes gradually evaporate by emitting a portion of their mass called Hawking radiation. According to the theory, the process occurs because on the event horizon (this is the point where the gravitational pull of a black hole is irreversible) pairs of particles are constantly forming and then annihilating each other again. According to Hawking, it can happen that only one particle is drawn into the black hole, while its counterpart is emitted as Hawking radiation.

World-famous astrophysicist Stephen Hawking smiles at the University of Cambridge symposium in honor of his 60th birthday in 2002.

World-famous astrophysicist Stephen Hawking smiles at the University of Cambridge symposium in honor of his 60th birthday in 2002.
Getty Images/Sion Tohig/Staff

The research team at Radboud University Nijmegen has now discovered, according to Research and Knowledge, that other massive objects also emit this type of radiation – and not just black holes, as previously thought. To do this, the scientists used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the role of the event horizon in the formation of this type of radiation. They found that an event horizon is not strictly necessary for radiation, which is why objects without an event horizon can exhibit this type of radiation. These include particularly massive objects, such as the remnants of dead stars.

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According to Research and Knowledge, in the long term, radiation emission and evaporation could mean that everything in our universe—not just black holes, as previously thought—will evaporate. According to the report, the new findings not only change our understanding of Hawking radiation, but also our knowledge of the universe and its future. You can read the full study in the scientific journal.Physical review letters” is reading.

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