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Serious riots with Frankfurt fans in Naples

Serious riots with Frankfurt fans in Naples

According to media reports, Frankfurt supporters attacked emergency services in central locations in the city.

Burning cars, destroying cafes, flares against police officers: before the Eintracht Frankfurt Champions League match in Naples, there were serious riots in Naples. Videos showed rioters threw objects such as tables, chairs and firecrackers at the emergency services on Wednesday afternoon. A police car was set on fire. According to media reports, the Frankfurt Ultras attacked police officers and policemen.

Previously, a few hundred Frankfurters would commute through the city together, but it was quiet at first. The state of Naples had earlier banned Frankfurt fans from entering the stadium to participate in the match in the evening. Enraged by this, Eintracht gave up the collection of tickets for the guests and called on their supporters not to come to Naples. Despite the appeal, several hundred Frankfurt fans traveled to Italy.

Flares and destruction

The authorities’ fears were confirmed on Wednesday afternoon: after an encouraging march from the port to the city center without incident, the situation escalated before dusk.

The videos showed, among other things, how masked hooligans destroyed the outside area of ​​a pub and threw chairs and tables at police officers. In the central Piazza del Gesu, rioters lit flares and also shot at nearby shops. A police car on an access road to the square caught fire and was burned.

It took some time before the police seemed to have the situation under control. Emergency services managed to put the Ultras on buses and take them back to their waterfront hotel from the city centre. Napoli fans reportedly pelted the buses with rocks and bottles.

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“The scenes of destruction in our historic city center are unacceptable,” said Gaetano Manfredi, the mayor of Naples. “We condemn in the strongest possible terms these unspeakable acts by those responsible, whoever committed them.”

(APA/DSPA)